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Book Club – The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds

October 21, 2011 by Nylabone Products  |  Book Club  |  Comments (0)  | 
The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds<br />

The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds by TFH Editors

A Field Guide to More Than 230 Dog Breeds and Varieties!

This compact and easy-to-use guide covers more than 230 dog breeds and varieties recognized by the world’s most prestigious kennel clubs. Discover pertinent information on a breed’s history, temperament, and care requirements. Plus, each breed is illustrated with full-color photos for easy identification. Also included is a short history on the origin of dog breeds, which helps round out this essential reference.

Each breed profile in The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds features:
• Brief history of the breed’s origins
• Personality profile
• Trainability
• Grooming needs
• Exercise needs
• Life span and health issues

From the most popular breeds to some of the most rare, The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds is the perfect reference for anyone who is fascinated by dogs!

About the Author:

The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds was compiled by TFH Editors with extensive knowledge and experience with dog breeds.

Book Excerpt: CANAAN DOG

Country of Origin: Israel
Height: males 20–24 in (51–61 cm)/females 19–23 in (48–58.5 cm) [AKC]
Weight: males 45–55 lb (20.5–25 kg)/females 35–45 lb (16–29.5 kg) [AKC]
Coat: Double coat with straight, harsh, flat-lying outercoat of short to medium length and straight, soft, short, flat-lying undercoat; slight ruff
Colors: Sand to red-brown, white, black, or spotted, with or without mask|two color patterns—predominantly white with mask, with or without patches of color/solid, with color ranging from black through all shades of brown (sandy to red or liver) [AKC]|solid or spotted, colors including any shade between cream and red-brown; no liver [UKC]
Other Names: Kelev K’naani
Registries (With Group): AKC (Herding); ANKC (Non Sporting); ARBA (Spitz & Primitive); CKC (Working); FCI (Spitz and Primitive); KC (Utility); UKC (Sighthound & Pariah)

HISTORY AND PERSONALITY

Cave drawings from 2200 BCE show dogs who look remarkably like the Canaan. He was a guard dog and herding dog to the ancient Israelites, and when the Jewish people were dispersed from the land thousands of years ago, these dogs began living in the Negev Desert. When the Jews returned to the land in the 1930s, they discovered these pariah dogs, almost like living fossils, existing in a feral state. The breed’s modern history began in the late 1930s to produce a dog to guard the kibbutz. Today’s Canaan Dog is a highly intelligent and trainable dog whose versatility has been tapped for mine detection work, sentry and messenger work, guiding the blind, and much more.
With ancestors who survived for thousands of years on their own, he retains a strong flight instinct as well as an innate ability to care for itself, so keeping him on leash in all but securely enclosed areas is a must unless he is highly trained. He is a devoted companion who is intelligent, affectionate with his family, and loves to play. He should be socialized with children and other animals from an early age to help lessen his natural reticence with strange people and animals.

CARE AND HEALTH

• The smart, quick Canaan Dog needs daily activity that will challenge him mentally and physically. Several long walks a day are not enough for this alert and responsive dog. He needs a job or to be involved in a sport.
• Because he is highly trainable and is an eager worker, training him is a joyful experience.
• He sheds seasonally, but otherwise the Canaan Dog is an easy breed to keep clean and neat with regular brushing.
• Average life span is 12 to 15 years. There are no reported breed-specific health concerns.

Excerpted from The Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds. © 2009 T.F.H. Publications, Inc. Used by Permission.


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